9 Best Cat Repellent & Deterrents For Your Garden That Actually Work

Cat repellents (also known as cat deterrents or cat scarers) are designed to repel, deter or scare cats away.

Typically they are used to discourage cats from entering a garden and using it as a toilet or from injuring or killing birds.

There are plenty of choices for anyone looking to deter cats, but which of them actually work?

Don’t worry we’ve done the research for you and come up with a list of 9 cat repellents that do work:

Best Jet Spray
Best Ultrasound
Best Solar Powered
Best for big gardens
Pestbye Jet Spray Repeller Motion Activated Fox...
Pestbye Battery Operated Motion Activated Waterproof...
zonpor Cat Repellent, Ultrasonic Animal Repeller Solar...
Defenders 7.9 x 17 x 31 cm Mega-Sonic Cat Repeller...
  1. Squirts a broad jet of water for 5 seconds - which will scare off even the bravest of cats

  2. Motion sensor activated

  3. Requires 4 x AA batteries
  1. Ultrasonic repellent with adjustable frequencies

  2. Motion sensor activated

  3. Requires 4 x AA batteries
  1. Ultrasonic repellent with adjustable frequencies

  2. Solar Powered
  1. Ultrasonic deterrent

  2. Motion sensor sensor has a large 12 metre detection range making it ideal for big gardens.
Best Jet Spray
Pestbye Jet Spray Repeller Motion Activated Fox...
  1. Squirts a broad jet of water for 5 seconds - which will scare off even the bravest of cats

  2. Motion sensor activated

  3. Requires 4 x AA batteries
Best Ultrasound
Pestbye Battery Operated Motion Activated Waterproof...
  1. Ultrasonic repellent with adjustable frequencies

  2. Motion sensor activated

  3. Requires 4 x AA batteries
Best Solar Powered
zonpor Cat Repellent, Ultrasonic Animal Repeller Solar...
  1. Ultrasonic repellent with adjustable frequencies

  2. Solar Powered
Best for big gardens
Defenders 7.9 x 17 x 31 cm Mega-Sonic Cat Repeller...
  1. Ultrasonic deterrent

  2. Motion sensor sensor has a large 12 metre detection range making it ideal for big gardens.

& the best of the rest:

Why Cat Deterrents?
Here at Tuxedo-Cat.co.uk we love cats so promoting cat deterrents may seem like a strange thing for us to be doing.

As cat owners ourselves we understand that there are plenty of places that you may want to deter your own cat, or any other cats, from going such as a vegetable plot or your flower beds.

Cat faeces can harm your plants so using a cat deterrent to keep cats away from delicate plants is a good idea.


Be aware:
No cat repellent is 100% effective – cats that are regularly exposed to irritating noises or smells will adjust and become desensitized to them over time.


1. PestBye Jet Spray Deterrent

While no cat deterrent is ever 100% effective jet spray deterrents come close. 

No one likes being surprised by having a cold (albeit harmless) jet of water squirted at them and cats are particularly water averse so sprinkler deterrents are very effective.

The PestBye Jet Spray is motion-activated, if the sensors detect movement within a range of up to 10 metres, a 5 second jet of water is squirted out.

You can adjust the spray so that it sprays out over a broader range meaning that regardless of where the cat is they will more than likely be caught in it, if somehow they escape a soaking most cats will still be startled enough by the sudden and unexpected jet of water in their vicinity that they won’t hang around long enough to give it a second chance.

To set the PestBye up simply connect it to a house, fit the 4xAA batteries (not included – these should last 3-4 months depending on how much use it gets), set the height of the spray and push the stake into the ground at an angle which will ensure the jet soaks any intruders. Then press the trigger and you’re good to go.

One thing to be aware of if you have a lot of foliage in your garden is that it can be set off by leaves blowing past it. So if you have more of a wild garden then this may not be the best choice (unless you are happy to give your lawn a thorough drink every day).

What’s Good:

  • Water is a highly effective way of getting rid of cats.
  • Simple to set up and use.

What’s not Good:

  • The motion sensor can sometimes be triggered by leaves blowing past.

2. Pestbye Ultrasonic Cat Scarer

The Pestbye is Amazon’s best selling cat scarer with over 4,000 reviews.

The battery-operated repeller (it needs 4 x AA batteries) is ultrasonic, this means that it scares cats by emitting a loud high-frequency noise which is too high pitched for humans too hear but is very alarming to cats and should scare them off (it also works for foxes and dogs).

One of the best features of the Pestbye is that you can adjust the frequency of the ultrasonic waves. 

One of the problems with ultrasonic cat deterrents is that cats hearing varies, some cats may not be able to hear higher frequencies, you can be certain that you will always get at least one cat who doesn’t seem to notice your ultrasonic device and it is usually the cat that is causing most damage to your garden!

Click image to view on Amazon

The Pestbye allows you to adjust the frequency levels so that your problem cat can definitely hear it, if the cat doesn’t seem to notice the noise initially simply reduce the frequency and increase the sensitivity.

It includes a motion detector so that the noise is only triggered when a cat is nearby, having the noise on constantly can allow cats to get used to it which will eventually render it ineffective so using a motion sensor allows it to surprise cats and it also helps save battery.

The motion sensor covers 110 degrees and the sensitivity of the sensor can be adjusted so that it will be triggered if anything moves within 7 metres or less of it.

It is very easy to install, you can either screw it to a wall or fence or you can push the stake it comes with it into the ground.

Battery life will vary depending on how much use it gets but typical use (or 10 activations a day) should give at least 3 months use before the batteries need changing.

What’s Good:

  • Adjustable ultrasonic frequencies.
  • Simple to install and use.
  • Motion activated so cats shouldn’t get used to the sound easily.

What’s not Good:

  • Some cats can be indifferent to it regardless of the frequency.

3. Zonpor Solar Cat Deterrent

The Zonpor is another ultrasound device which we have to include because it uses solar power to keep its batteries charged up. Instead of having to change the batteries every 3-4 months as with most other products the Zonpor should keep going for years.

This repellent uses an Infrared sensor to detect motion which then starts a mix of ultrasonic and sonic sounds mixed with flashing LED strobe lights to confuse and scare cats away. 

It can detect movement in an arch of 110 degrees at a range of up to 9 metres away.

It also has 5 different frequency settings, the most effective setting for cats is setting number two which outputs sounds in the 19.5KHZ-24.5KHZ range, however if you find this isn’t working try settings number 1 or 3.

What’s Good:

  • Adjustable ultrasonic frequencies.
  • Simple to install and use.
  • Solar powered.

What’s not Good:

  • Some cats may be indifferent to the noise.

4. Defenders Sonic Cat Repeller

The Defenders Sonic is an electrical cat deterrent which uses ultrasound to scare cats away.

It operates in much the same way as the PestBye however the key differences are:

It covers a broader range, the motion sensor can detect movement up to 12 metres away and it can be either mains operated or battery operated (2 x 9Vs).

This makes it ideal for larger gardens, you can save a few quid by buying the three-pack which gives a small discount and will allow you to cover a lot of ground with them.

If you are the type of person (like myself) who is likely to completely forget to ever change the batteries then the option of plugging up to the mains is particularly useful as once it is set up you can just forget about it and (hopefully) enjoy your cat free garden long into the future.

What’s Good:

  • Adjustable ultrasonic frequencies.
  • Huge area covered, up to 12 metre range, ideal for large gardens.
  • Can run from the mains.

What’s not Good:

  • Some cats may be indifferent to the noise.


5. Spikes

You can’t write about cat deterrents without writing about spikes.

Spikes can work as an effective deterrent if your garden is surrounded by a high wall. Fitting spikes to the top of it makes for an uncomfortable landing for any cat that is thinking of jumping over.

The idea is that once your spikes are fitted cats will quickly come to realise that jumping onto your wall is an uncomfortable experience and will learn to avoid doing it.

Reading various reviews of these sort of spikes reveals that once again, the effectiveness of them varies greatly.

While some users claim that they have seen cats and foxes happily frolicking on top of the spikes others state that their garden has been completely intruder free ever since installing them!

In order to maximise your chances of success with spikes, it is important that the wall or fence you are installing them on is fairly high, a cat should have to jump at least 6 foot to get on top of the wall, this sort of height will make for an uncomfortable landing. Lower walls or walls where there are easy access points (such as the roof of a shed) will be easy for curious cats to climb onto and walk across regardless of the spikes.

What’s Good:

  • They stop cats getting in while not disturbing your cat inside the garden.
  • Simple solution which requires no batteries or maintenance once installed.

What’s not Good:

  • Only really works on walls or fences which are at least 6 foot.
  • Determined cats often find a way to get past the spikes.

6. Silent Roar Lion Manure

A box full of lion poo. Yep, that’s exactly what this is and it sells well, with around 600 reviews on Amazon, this is a popular product.

Cats are territorial creatures who are very aware of scents. If a new cat comes into their territory and starts defecating and urinating all over the place your cat will not be very happy about it.

Cats can tell a lot about each other from their smell, the idea of using lion manure is to make any would-be feline intruder believe that this is the territory of a huge lion so if they’ve got any sense they’ll stay well away.

As with all cat deterrents the effectiveness of them can vary wildly.

Some users talk of how cats which previously swarmed over their garden now sit forlornly on the wall looking wistfully into the garden but never daring to enter, other users share how they spotted a cat taking a nap on a lump of lion manure.

It’s a cheap product so it’s definitely worth trying out, you never know it may solve your cat problem.

What’s Good:

  • Cheap and easy to use.
  • Eco friendly.

What’s not Good:

  • Some cats aren’t bothered by it at all.
  • It stinks!

7. Get Off Cat & Dog Crystals

Get Off is a crystal-like jelly substance which you spread on your lawn and flowerbeds. Over time it breaks down and releases a strong smell which is particularly pungent and confusing to cats and dogs and will discourage them from being in a particular part of your garden.

The downsides to this product are that it is not suitable for areas where children play and if you have persistent heavy rain then it will quickly be washed away.

This isn’t a permanent solution, realistically you can expect the effects to last for about a week before you will need to reapply the crystals.

If you are looking for a quick short term temporary solution to your cat problem then this could work.

What’s Good:

  • Cheap and easy to use.

What’s not Good:

  • Need to reapply every week or so.
  • Not suitable for use in gardens where children play.
  • Ineffective in damp conditions.

8. Hot Exit

Hot Exit is a spicy dutch product which is made with red pepper extract.

Cats (& dogs) don’t like hot spicy things, so spread the pellets around your garden to deter cats from spending time there. 

One of the drawbacks to this product is that rain quickly renders it ineffective by washing it away, another drawback is that it is not suitable for gardens which regularly have kids playing there. Although it is non-toxic you don’t want children to get it on their hands and rubs it in their eyes.

What’s Good:

  • Cheap and easy to use.

What’s not Good:

  • Need to reapply every week or so.
  • Not suitable for use in gardens where children play.
  • Ineffective in damp conditions.

9. Neudorff Super Strength

Neudorff is a German company which has been developing home and garden products in one form or another since 1854, they take great care to ensure that their products are safe and environmentally friendly.

This product is made from plant-based oil which is stored in clay granule pellets meaning it will do no harm to your garden and is safe for use in gardens where children play.

Their Super Strength Cat Repellent masks territorial cat smells making them avoid the area, it claims to be able to stop cats fouling in your garden for up to two weeks (depending on the weather) without the need for reapplication.

What’s Good:

  • Cheap and easy to use.
  • Eco friendly

What’s not Good:

  • Need to reapply every week or so.
  • Not suitable for use in gardens where children play.
  • Ineffective in damp conditions.

Alternative Methods of Deterring Cats:

If you’d rather explore some cheaper home remedy style methods of stopping cats from pooping in your garden then try some of these ideas below, be aware that these are far less effective than the purpose-made deterrents however they are usually cheaper and they may work for some cats.

ginger cat in a garden, looking for a place to poop

1. Using Plants & Smells to Deter Cats

Cats are very sensitive to scent, this is because they have more than twice as many scent sensitive cells in their noses than humans do.

If you can put a scent they don’t like in their path chances are they will avoid going near it.

Some plants that cats hate include:

  • Lavender
  • Pennyroyal
  • Rue
  • Any Citrus Plant
  • Plectranthus Caninus

Planting some of these in and around your garden can help deter cats from visiting.

Be aware that over time cats are likely to get used to the smell and be less deterred by it.

2. Is Vinegar a Good Cat Repellent?

Vinegar can be effective, its strong scent is another thing which cats do not like. 

Simply spray undiluted white vinegar around the edge of your garden (taking care to avoid delicate plants as it can be harmful to them).

A big issue with a vinegar deterrent is that it will quickly evaporate, be diluted or washed away (particularly in the UK) meaning regular reapplication is necessary so it is only ever a very short term solution at best.

3. Is Orange Peel a Good Cat Repellent?

As previously mentioned cats aren’t too keen on the smell of citrus.

Collecting citrus peel and spreading it around your garden can help ward off cats, though be aware that many people have tried this method and seen no results at all!

To have the best possible chance of success chop the peel up into small squares (2cm) to release the citrus scent, then spread it out on your border (the denser the better), cover the peel with bark or mulch to help keep it in place.

4. Are Egg Shells a Good Cat Repellent?

The theory behind this method is that cats don’t like walking on sharp uncomfortable things such as crushed eggshells.

This method is very ineffective – unless you run an egg shelling factory you are unlikely to have anywhere near enough eggshell to cat-proof even the smallest of gardens, cats will tread between the bits of shell with ease.

Eggshell can help fertilise your lawn but we wouldn’t count on it when it comes to keeping cats away.


We hope this article has helped you find a product which stops cats from damaging, popping in or generally causing trouble in your garden. Thanks for reading.

Leave a Reply